Proposal Title

Leveraging a Manual Accounting Cycle Project in Accounting Principles Courses

Proposal Abstract

Understanding the accounting cycle is critical to students' successful completion of their first introductory college accounting course. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the completion of a written comprehensive accounting cycle assignment will help students understand the accounting cycle better, ultimately leading to a better grade in the course. The assignment requires students to complete the accounting cycle for a service company's second month of business by hand. The assignment is offered as extra credit with much of the work done in class in conjunction with the instructor. The study population will include approximately 130 students who were enrolled in the author's five Accounting Principles I courses from Fall 2013 through Fall 2014. Data collected will be anonymous and will include students' scores on the accounting cycle assignment and on the accounting cycle exam, students' grades in the course, and students' cumulative GPAs. If students who successfully completed the extra credit assignment performed better than expected, the evidence would suggest that the accounting cycle assignment made a positive impact on student understanding and grade outcome.

Location

Room 2010

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 25th, 4:00 PM Mar 25th, 4:45 PM

Leveraging a Manual Accounting Cycle Project in Accounting Principles Courses

Room 2010

Understanding the accounting cycle is critical to students' successful completion of their first introductory college accounting course. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the completion of a written comprehensive accounting cycle assignment will help students understand the accounting cycle better, ultimately leading to a better grade in the course. The assignment requires students to complete the accounting cycle for a service company's second month of business by hand. The assignment is offered as extra credit with much of the work done in class in conjunction with the instructor. The study population will include approximately 130 students who were enrolled in the author's five Accounting Principles I courses from Fall 2013 through Fall 2014. Data collected will be anonymous and will include students' scores on the accounting cycle assignment and on the accounting cycle exam, students' grades in the course, and students' cumulative GPAs. If students who successfully completed the extra credit assignment performed better than expected, the evidence would suggest that the accounting cycle assignment made a positive impact on student understanding and grade outcome.