Proposal Title

Creative Conflict – Building a New Online Graduate Program

Proposal Abstract

This session will present the results of a phenomenology on the establishment of an online and hybrid class-based graduate program at a university in the southern United States. Using Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) as a theory base, this applied research presentation illustrates the factors involved in the establishment of the program from the perspectives of the faculty members charged with its construction. Results included faculty concerns about the seeming change from the traditional identity of the institution as a hands-on, personalized instructional paradigm to what was perceived as a depersonalized online environment. We believe this session fits the conference theme of institutional identity and promotes thinking among teacher educators in similar settings. Such discussions and an illustration of the tools used in this analysis help promote examinations of such issues informing teacher education praxis in the current and future teacher education marketplace. The information shared during the session will allow participants to utilize these tools in analyzing their own institutional needs.

The presenters will utilize PowerPoint during their presentation. Handouts of the conceptual theory model will be provided to participants along with guiding questions to implement the model in their own institution for use in similar programmatic analysis.

Location

Room 2011

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Share

COinS
 
Mar 26th, 2:00 PM Mar 26th, 2:45 PM

Creative Conflict – Building a New Online Graduate Program

Room 2011

This session will present the results of a phenomenology on the establishment of an online and hybrid class-based graduate program at a university in the southern United States. Using Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) as a theory base, this applied research presentation illustrates the factors involved in the establishment of the program from the perspectives of the faculty members charged with its construction. Results included faculty concerns about the seeming change from the traditional identity of the institution as a hands-on, personalized instructional paradigm to what was perceived as a depersonalized online environment. We believe this session fits the conference theme of institutional identity and promotes thinking among teacher educators in similar settings. Such discussions and an illustration of the tools used in this analysis help promote examinations of such issues informing teacher education praxis in the current and future teacher education marketplace. The information shared during the session will allow participants to utilize these tools in analyzing their own institutional needs.

The presenters will utilize PowerPoint during their presentation. Handouts of the conceptual theory model will be provided to participants along with guiding questions to implement the model in their own institution for use in similar programmatic analysis.