Proposal Title

Non Satis Scire: To Know is Not Enough--Implementing Metacognitive Strategies into Course Curriculum

Proposal Abstract

The Quality Enhancement Plan at Southern Crescent Technical College has established a 14-month, collaborative, interdisciplinary faculty peer mentoring program devoted to the study of the science of learning and metacognition. Required for junior faculty and with optional participation open to senior faculty, the goal of the program is to evaluate faculty knowledge and implement metacognitive strategies into course curriculum, ensuring that learning strategies are taught as part of the content area rather than in abstraction. In the first phase of the program, faculty participate in a structured mentoring curriculum and engage in conversations about best practices that lead to a course redesign. Data from the first mentoring cycle suggests that faculty benefit from the exercise of examining and explaining their course design to others, as well as from the feedback they receive when doing so. During the second phase of the mentoring cycle, the faculty peer group implements the redesigned courses and studies students' responses to learning strategies instruction. Initial results from the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory indicate that between 56 and 73% of the students participating self-report attitudes and behaviors that are not conducive to learning before exposure to the redesigned course. The presentation of this five-year research project will to share initial results from the study intended to engage colleagues in a dialogue about the potential impact of a curriculum-focused, faculty peer-mentoring program on the classroom environment, and particularly on students’ attitudes and behaviors toward learning.

Location

Room 2005

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Share

COinS
 
Mar 25th, 10:00 AM Mar 25th, 10:45 AM

Non Satis Scire: To Know is Not Enough--Implementing Metacognitive Strategies into Course Curriculum

Room 2005

The Quality Enhancement Plan at Southern Crescent Technical College has established a 14-month, collaborative, interdisciplinary faculty peer mentoring program devoted to the study of the science of learning and metacognition. Required for junior faculty and with optional participation open to senior faculty, the goal of the program is to evaluate faculty knowledge and implement metacognitive strategies into course curriculum, ensuring that learning strategies are taught as part of the content area rather than in abstraction. In the first phase of the program, faculty participate in a structured mentoring curriculum and engage in conversations about best practices that lead to a course redesign. Data from the first mentoring cycle suggests that faculty benefit from the exercise of examining and explaining their course design to others, as well as from the feedback they receive when doing so. During the second phase of the mentoring cycle, the faculty peer group implements the redesigned courses and studies students' responses to learning strategies instruction. Initial results from the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory indicate that between 56 and 73% of the students participating self-report attitudes and behaviors that are not conducive to learning before exposure to the redesigned course. The presentation of this five-year research project will to share initial results from the study intended to engage colleagues in a dialogue about the potential impact of a curriculum-focused, faculty peer-mentoring program on the classroom environment, and particularly on students’ attitudes and behaviors toward learning.