Proposal Abstract

Faculty members are often asked to teach in an online or hybrid environment without much formal faculty development. As a faculty member in this situation, I enrolled in a MOOC on Google and became the student. By analyzing how the course was moderated, I was able to reflect on my own teaching and implement changes in online and hybrid courses with the ultimate goal of improving student learning. As a model of faculty development, the practice of teacher as student provides a rich opportunity to improve teaching skills and hopefully, student learning as well. I will provide a brief overview of my own reflective practice about online teaching (informed by extant research on reflective and online learning -- e.g. Cranton & King, 2003; Duarte, 2007) and then facilitate a lively audience discussion about reflective practice in teaching online courses. The majority of the presentation will be spent in audience discussion.

By the end of the presentation, audience members will be able to:

1) Articulate faculty development benefits of the teacher becoming the student in an online environment.

2) Discuss the importance of self-reflection and meta-cognition in faculty development.

3) Engage in an audience discussion on reflective practice in online/hybrid teaching.

Location

Room 2005

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 26th, 10:00 AM Mar 26th, 10:45 AM

Teacher as Student: How Enrolling in a MOOC Changed How I Teach (And Hopefully How My Students Learn!)

Room 2005

Faculty members are often asked to teach in an online or hybrid environment without much formal faculty development. As a faculty member in this situation, I enrolled in a MOOC on Google and became the student. By analyzing how the course was moderated, I was able to reflect on my own teaching and implement changes in online and hybrid courses with the ultimate goal of improving student learning. As a model of faculty development, the practice of teacher as student provides a rich opportunity to improve teaching skills and hopefully, student learning as well. I will provide a brief overview of my own reflective practice about online teaching (informed by extant research on reflective and online learning -- e.g. Cranton & King, 2003; Duarte, 2007) and then facilitate a lively audience discussion about reflective practice in teaching online courses. The majority of the presentation will be spent in audience discussion.

By the end of the presentation, audience members will be able to:

1) Articulate faculty development benefits of the teacher becoming the student in an online environment.

2) Discuss the importance of self-reflection and meta-cognition in faculty development.

3) Engage in an audience discussion on reflective practice in online/hybrid teaching.