Proposal Title

Using Portfolios as a Measure of Student Learning Outcomes

Proposal Abstract

The most innovative teaching strategy is not useful if there are no methods for validating student learning. Student portfolios are one option. We created a portfolio process to assess Student Learning Outcomes (SLO) using a measure termed the Outcome Assessment Tool (OAT Form). The process began with curriculum mapping to determine critical assignments addressing learning for each SLO. A compilation of critical assignments for each semester was submitted by the student twice during the program. When students completed a critical assignment, they performed a self-evaluation on the OAT form and submitted both documents to the course instructor who then completed the faculty evaluation portion. The assignment and the completed OAT were returned to the student for submission in the portfolio. The portfolio also included a student narrative addressing their perception of growth across semesters in relation to each SLO. The faculty advisor reviewed the portfolio and evaluated student progression on each SLO. Faculty advisors gave feedback on strengths/weaknesses based on OAT ratings and the narrative using specific criteria. Data from the OATs were aggregated across and analyzed by our Outcomes Committee. Results were reviewed by faculty to determine the degree to which SLOs were being met and informed plans for needed changes. Evolution and modifications in the process over a 10 year period will be presented. Challenges and recommendations for using portfolios will also be discussed.

Location

Room 1220 A

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 26th, 2:00 PM Mar 26th, 2:45 PM

Using Portfolios as a Measure of Student Learning Outcomes

Room 1220 A

The most innovative teaching strategy is not useful if there are no methods for validating student learning. Student portfolios are one option. We created a portfolio process to assess Student Learning Outcomes (SLO) using a measure termed the Outcome Assessment Tool (OAT Form). The process began with curriculum mapping to determine critical assignments addressing learning for each SLO. A compilation of critical assignments for each semester was submitted by the student twice during the program. When students completed a critical assignment, they performed a self-evaluation on the OAT form and submitted both documents to the course instructor who then completed the faculty evaluation portion. The assignment and the completed OAT were returned to the student for submission in the portfolio. The portfolio also included a student narrative addressing their perception of growth across semesters in relation to each SLO. The faculty advisor reviewed the portfolio and evaluated student progression on each SLO. Faculty advisors gave feedback on strengths/weaknesses based on OAT ratings and the narrative using specific criteria. Data from the OATs were aggregated across and analyzed by our Outcomes Committee. Results were reviewed by faculty to determine the degree to which SLOs were being met and informed plans for needed changes. Evolution and modifications in the process over a 10 year period will be presented. Challenges and recommendations for using portfolios will also be discussed.