Proposal Title

If You Create It, They Will Read

Proposal Abstract

Many college courses use reading assignments outside of class time, yet students do not always complete assigned readings (Berry, Cook, Hill, & Stevens, 2010; Phillips & Phillips, 2007; Sikorski et al., 2002). Using innovative ways designed to help students retain the important concepts from the readings could encourage students to read. This study used a short answer pretest/posttest design and a questionnaire to determine the effectiveness of three different strategies (i.e., the reading retention strategy, the brain reading retention strategy, and SEE-I) that were designed or adapted to reinforce the concepts in course readings. The result of this study, which included 35 education undergraduate students as participants, indicated that all three strategies were more effective for student retention of concepts than students reading without implementing a strategy. The objectives of the presentation are to use active learning strategies (e.g., think-pair-share, fish bowl discussions, and pass-the-paper) to share the results of the study, offer attendees recommendations for implementing the three reading strategies, and participate in an activity wherein attendees can plan how they might implement one or more of these strategies in their course.

Location

Room 2010

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 26th, 10:00 AM Mar 26th, 10:45 AM

If You Create It, They Will Read

Room 2010

Many college courses use reading assignments outside of class time, yet students do not always complete assigned readings (Berry, Cook, Hill, & Stevens, 2010; Phillips & Phillips, 2007; Sikorski et al., 2002). Using innovative ways designed to help students retain the important concepts from the readings could encourage students to read. This study used a short answer pretest/posttest design and a questionnaire to determine the effectiveness of three different strategies (i.e., the reading retention strategy, the brain reading retention strategy, and SEE-I) that were designed or adapted to reinforce the concepts in course readings. The result of this study, which included 35 education undergraduate students as participants, indicated that all three strategies were more effective for student retention of concepts than students reading without implementing a strategy. The objectives of the presentation are to use active learning strategies (e.g., think-pair-share, fish bowl discussions, and pass-the-paper) to share the results of the study, offer attendees recommendations for implementing the three reading strategies, and participate in an activity wherein attendees can plan how they might implement one or more of these strategies in their course.