Proposal Title

Calculus Problem Solving: Can a Flipped Classroom Help?

Proposal Abstract

A three year study was conducted at a small liberal arts college on calculus I and calculus II students to answer the question: “Can calculus problem solving be enhanced through a flipped classroom?” The study was conducted to both calculus I and calculus II students. A typical calculus problem solving process involves several steps which carry out a plan originating from certain initial strategies. While the initial strategies and some of the steps are usually linked directly to calculus, certain other steps are heavily dependent on the students’ prior knowledge on algebra and trigonometry. Our study shows that while flipping the classroom may not have a significant impact on the overall problem solving performance of students, it does have a significant positive impact on the “calculus only” components of the problem solving process. The presentation will also demonstrate efficient ways of making flipped videos and good practices as well as provide a survey of the existing research on flipped classrooms.

Location

Room 1220 B

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 27th, 11:00 AM Mar 27th, 11:45 AM

Calculus Problem Solving: Can a Flipped Classroom Help?

Room 1220 B

A three year study was conducted at a small liberal arts college on calculus I and calculus II students to answer the question: “Can calculus problem solving be enhanced through a flipped classroom?” The study was conducted to both calculus I and calculus II students. A typical calculus problem solving process involves several steps which carry out a plan originating from certain initial strategies. While the initial strategies and some of the steps are usually linked directly to calculus, certain other steps are heavily dependent on the students’ prior knowledge on algebra and trigonometry. Our study shows that while flipping the classroom may not have a significant impact on the overall problem solving performance of students, it does have a significant positive impact on the “calculus only” components of the problem solving process. The presentation will also demonstrate efficient ways of making flipped videos and good practices as well as provide a survey of the existing research on flipped classrooms.