Proposal Abstract

Experiential learning (EL) has long been established as effective and dynamic in higher education. This active approach has been proven to provide participants the ability to apply and integrate prior experiences, as well as reflect upon outcomes of a project and their skill development. EL can be offered through an array of options, including computer simulations, cases, service learning, internships and co-operative education. Another option in this spectrum is “action learning”, which “connects theory with practice, and requires dynamic sense-making, fact-based decisions, high-performance teamwork, and persuasive communication” (http://grahammercer.com). Although co-operative education is the most comprehensive, action learning consulting-based projects provide similar, stronger and complimentary results in the perceived learning benefits to participants, compared to co-operative education. The inclusion of action learning in academic programs can be a successful alternative or compliment to other forms of EL to meet overall institutional goals.

The session will

Review common methods of EL in academia

Present Drexel LeBow’s offerings in, and EVP’s model for, consulting-based projects

Provide comparative data of student perceptions of learning (skills and experiences gained that are applicable to their future careers and studies) between two forms of action learning: consulting-based projects and co-operative education (significant data collected via a thirty item, 5 point scale questionnaire completed by participants in both consulting-based courses (on thirty campuses) and co-operative education (at Drexel University)

Present the authors’ research approach and methodology, subsequent and findings/results/observations

Discuss potential application in comparable programs among attendees at various institutions and within unique programs of study

Location

Room 115

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 27th, 2:00 PM Mar 27th, 2:45 PM

Consulting-Based Action Learning as an Experiential Learning Alternative

Room 115

Experiential learning (EL) has long been established as effective and dynamic in higher education. This active approach has been proven to provide participants the ability to apply and integrate prior experiences, as well as reflect upon outcomes of a project and their skill development. EL can be offered through an array of options, including computer simulations, cases, service learning, internships and co-operative education. Another option in this spectrum is “action learning”, which “connects theory with practice, and requires dynamic sense-making, fact-based decisions, high-performance teamwork, and persuasive communication” (http://grahammercer.com). Although co-operative education is the most comprehensive, action learning consulting-based projects provide similar, stronger and complimentary results in the perceived learning benefits to participants, compared to co-operative education. The inclusion of action learning in academic programs can be a successful alternative or compliment to other forms of EL to meet overall institutional goals.

The session will

Review common methods of EL in academia

Present Drexel LeBow’s offerings in, and EVP’s model for, consulting-based projects

Provide comparative data of student perceptions of learning (skills and experiences gained that are applicable to their future careers and studies) between two forms of action learning: consulting-based projects and co-operative education (significant data collected via a thirty item, 5 point scale questionnaire completed by participants in both consulting-based courses (on thirty campuses) and co-operative education (at Drexel University)

Present the authors’ research approach and methodology, subsequent and findings/results/observations

Discuss potential application in comparable programs among attendees at various institutions and within unique programs of study