Proposal Abstract

As the blended model of course delivery becomes more prevalent in higher education, there is a corresponding need to develop faculty skills and comfort with teaching using this format. At Holy Family University, the expansion of blended courses offerings has been considerable over the last year resulting in three studies that explore the best approach or approaches to support faculty in teaching using the blended model. Studies include piloting a system of experienced faculty mentoring inexperienced colleagues in designing blended courses, exploring the use of co-teaching as a viable method of providing training and support to faculty in the design and management of the blended course, and a faculty workshop with subsequent ongoing support as needed with a focus on course improvement through the implementation of student feedback on the benefits and challenges of a blended course (feedback obtained through a previous study conducted at Holy Family University). Student achievement and experience are also explored in two studies. These studies are either in progress or will begin in December 2014 and will continue through the spring 2014 semester. Investigators will share preliminary findings and lead a discussion of the merits of each approach to faculty professional development and support.

Location

Room 115

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 27th, 11:00 AM Mar 27th, 11:45 AM

Identifying Effective Methods of Faculty Training and Support in the Design, Instruction, and Management of Blended Courses

Room 115

As the blended model of course delivery becomes more prevalent in higher education, there is a corresponding need to develop faculty skills and comfort with teaching using this format. At Holy Family University, the expansion of blended courses offerings has been considerable over the last year resulting in three studies that explore the best approach or approaches to support faculty in teaching using the blended model. Studies include piloting a system of experienced faculty mentoring inexperienced colleagues in designing blended courses, exploring the use of co-teaching as a viable method of providing training and support to faculty in the design and management of the blended course, and a faculty workshop with subsequent ongoing support as needed with a focus on course improvement through the implementation of student feedback on the benefits and challenges of a blended course (feedback obtained through a previous study conducted at Holy Family University). Student achievement and experience are also explored in two studies. These studies are either in progress or will begin in December 2014 and will continue through the spring 2014 semester. Investigators will share preliminary findings and lead a discussion of the merits of each approach to faculty professional development and support.