Proposal Abstract

A study exploring the attainment of learning objectives in online and face-to-face death and dying classes utilized an undergraduate student as co-researcher with a faculty member. The study utilized narrative analysis of students’ reflective journal entries at midpoint and end of course. Students explored the correlation between various learning strategies such as class discussions, readings, quizzes and films and the attainment of each course objective in their journals. The student researcher worked collaboratively with the instructor to analyze the content of the journal entries. The student reearcher’s work was supported through a single credit independent study over three semesters. The analysis process was enriched by the perspectives of a student researcher in coding and thematic development. There were similarities and differences between the two learning environments, online and face-to-face, with regard to the awareness of the views of others, questioning ones perspective and shifts in levels of comfort with the topic of death and dying. This presentation includes information on both the process of SoTL research collaborations between a student and a faculty member and the thematic results that emerged from this joint research project.

Through this presentation participants will:

  1. Enhance their knowledge of strategies to enhance their SoTL research
  2. Increase their understanding of the advantages of working collaboratively with students as co-researchers
  3. Increase their understanding of the differences and similarities regarding the learning in online and face-to-face learning environments, with a particular focus on the challenging topic of death and dying

Location

Room 2005

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 26th, 3:00 PM Mar 26th, 3:45 PM

Integrating the Student Perspective into the Research Process: Students as Co-Researcher

Room 2005

A study exploring the attainment of learning objectives in online and face-to-face death and dying classes utilized an undergraduate student as co-researcher with a faculty member. The study utilized narrative analysis of students’ reflective journal entries at midpoint and end of course. Students explored the correlation between various learning strategies such as class discussions, readings, quizzes and films and the attainment of each course objective in their journals. The student researcher worked collaboratively with the instructor to analyze the content of the journal entries. The student reearcher’s work was supported through a single credit independent study over three semesters. The analysis process was enriched by the perspectives of a student researcher in coding and thematic development. There were similarities and differences between the two learning environments, online and face-to-face, with regard to the awareness of the views of others, questioning ones perspective and shifts in levels of comfort with the topic of death and dying. This presentation includes information on both the process of SoTL research collaborations between a student and a faculty member and the thematic results that emerged from this joint research project.

Through this presentation participants will:

  1. Enhance their knowledge of strategies to enhance their SoTL research
  2. Increase their understanding of the advantages of working collaboratively with students as co-researchers
  3. Increase their understanding of the differences and similarities regarding the learning in online and face-to-face learning environments, with a particular focus on the challenging topic of death and dying