Proposal Abstract

Presentation will follow a traditional learning cycle format of:

1. Exploration - How to make and use Concept maps;

2. Explanation - Meaningful Learning Theory, Concept maps, Empirical evidence from the author’s research; and

3. Application - Learning Theory exercise.

Objectives:

1. Construct a concept map.

2. Participate in a discussion of the meaningful learning theory and concept mapping in the active learning environment.

3. Discuss empirical evidence associated with quasi-experimental, longitudinal investigations using resident and distance learning student cohorts

4. Investigate the relationship between concept mapping and the information processing model of memory.

Background:

Meaningful learning is the non-arbitrary assimilation of new information pertaining to new concepts and procedures into the learner’s knowledge structure, requiring the learner to become an active participant in the learning process. Concept mapping as a meaningful learning strategy encourages the learner to actively organize their knowledge structures into more powerful, integrated idiosyncratic patterns. Empirical evidence from two separate quasi-experimental, longitudinal investigations using resident and distance learning cohorts indicate significant student success for students who concept map. This research shows that the concept map works well as a functional tool in eliciting meaningful learning in students, which then leads to enhanced conceptual understanding between students and their teachers, or between students themselves. In this process, the concept map has proven to be an enhanced method to represent an individual’s conceptual understanding that facilitates both assessment and remediation, and moved the student towards more active learning, problem solving and reasoning.

Location

Room 115

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 28th, 9:00 AM Mar 28th, 9:45 AM

Concept Mapping as a Meaningful Learning Tool to Promote Conceptual Understanding and Clinical Reasoning for Resident and Distance Learning Students

Room 115

Presentation will follow a traditional learning cycle format of:

1. Exploration - How to make and use Concept maps;

2. Explanation - Meaningful Learning Theory, Concept maps, Empirical evidence from the author’s research; and

3. Application - Learning Theory exercise.

Objectives:

1. Construct a concept map.

2. Participate in a discussion of the meaningful learning theory and concept mapping in the active learning environment.

3. Discuss empirical evidence associated with quasi-experimental, longitudinal investigations using resident and distance learning student cohorts

4. Investigate the relationship between concept mapping and the information processing model of memory.

Background:

Meaningful learning is the non-arbitrary assimilation of new information pertaining to new concepts and procedures into the learner’s knowledge structure, requiring the learner to become an active participant in the learning process. Concept mapping as a meaningful learning strategy encourages the learner to actively organize their knowledge structures into more powerful, integrated idiosyncratic patterns. Empirical evidence from two separate quasi-experimental, longitudinal investigations using resident and distance learning cohorts indicate significant student success for students who concept map. This research shows that the concept map works well as a functional tool in eliciting meaningful learning in students, which then leads to enhanced conceptual understanding between students and their teachers, or between students themselves. In this process, the concept map has proven to be an enhanced method to represent an individual’s conceptual understanding that facilitates both assessment and remediation, and moved the student towards more active learning, problem solving and reasoning.