Proposal Title

Voice Thread as a Pedagogical Tool in Asynchronous Courses

Proposal Abstract

The primary aim of this research in progress is to report on the implementation of Voice Thread as a tool faculty and students at Delta State University's College of Education and Human Sciences used in asynchronous courses. Our research started with a grant proposal submission aimed in securing funds for purchasing Voice Thread licenses for ten of our faculty. We were awarded an Instructional Technology Grant in December 2013 in order to implement Voice Thread for ten online courses for the spring of 2014. This pilot study will seek to address three primary research questions: (1) Does Voice Thread engage students and faculty in specific course objectives? (2) What evidences are there that Voice Thread can be utilized to meet specific learning outcomes? (3) Based on our initial pilot study, is it plausible to expand Voice Thread to other faculty? We will utilize a mixed-methods research for our data collection. A pre- and post-test questionnaire will be administered to faculty and students. Additionally, two open-ended questions will be asked. Data will be analyzed descriptively and interpretively. Attendees will be able to learn how Video Thread technology can facilitate course delivery and interaction in online learning.

Location

Room 1002

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 28th, 9:00 AM Mar 28th, 9:45 AM

Voice Thread as a Pedagogical Tool in Asynchronous Courses

Room 1002

The primary aim of this research in progress is to report on the implementation of Voice Thread as a tool faculty and students at Delta State University's College of Education and Human Sciences used in asynchronous courses. Our research started with a grant proposal submission aimed in securing funds for purchasing Voice Thread licenses for ten of our faculty. We were awarded an Instructional Technology Grant in December 2013 in order to implement Voice Thread for ten online courses for the spring of 2014. This pilot study will seek to address three primary research questions: (1) Does Voice Thread engage students and faculty in specific course objectives? (2) What evidences are there that Voice Thread can be utilized to meet specific learning outcomes? (3) Based on our initial pilot study, is it plausible to expand Voice Thread to other faculty? We will utilize a mixed-methods research for our data collection. A pre- and post-test questionnaire will be administered to faculty and students. Additionally, two open-ended questions will be asked. Data will be analyzed descriptively and interpretively. Attendees will be able to learn how Video Thread technology can facilitate course delivery and interaction in online learning.