Proposal Title

Integrating Self-Authorship Theory into Teaching and Learning Practices for International Students in U.S. Classrooms

Presenters

Xi YuFollow

Proposal Abstract

This study applies the principles and values of self-authorship student development theory to international student teaching and learning practices for better interacting international students in the U.S. postsecondary classrooms. Baxter Magolda (2001) presented the path of self-authorship student development that students may go through, consisting of following formulas, crossroads, becoming the author of one’s life, and internal foundation phases. When teaching international students especially facing mixed demographical groups of students in classrooms, faculty may also experience these phases themselves too, and be challenged or confused by the difficulties of implementing teaching given the cultural differences and diversity. Self-authoring reflective thinking is needed for faculty to go beyond their comfort zones, adjust and test their teaching styles towards the diverse learning styles brought in to the classroom by students, and also assist students to adjust their learning styles to adapt to the class as well. This integrative review presents a synthesis of extant literature discussing self-authorship theory’s application into teaching and learning practices, implies the integration of this theory into multicultural teaching and learning practices, and also provides recommendations and strategies for faculty or teachers how to utilize self-authorship theory to develop the self-authoring journey together with their students.

Location

Room 113

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 27th, 4:00 PM Mar 27th, 5:30 PM

Integrating Self-Authorship Theory into Teaching and Learning Practices for International Students in U.S. Classrooms

Room 113

This study applies the principles and values of self-authorship student development theory to international student teaching and learning practices for better interacting international students in the U.S. postsecondary classrooms. Baxter Magolda (2001) presented the path of self-authorship student development that students may go through, consisting of following formulas, crossroads, becoming the author of one’s life, and internal foundation phases. When teaching international students especially facing mixed demographical groups of students in classrooms, faculty may also experience these phases themselves too, and be challenged or confused by the difficulties of implementing teaching given the cultural differences and diversity. Self-authoring reflective thinking is needed for faculty to go beyond their comfort zones, adjust and test their teaching styles towards the diverse learning styles brought in to the classroom by students, and also assist students to adjust their learning styles to adapt to the class as well. This integrative review presents a synthesis of extant literature discussing self-authorship theory’s application into teaching and learning practices, implies the integration of this theory into multicultural teaching and learning practices, and also provides recommendations and strategies for faculty or teachers how to utilize self-authorship theory to develop the self-authoring journey together with their students.