Proposal Abstract

The objective is to highlight the importance of using results of systematic investigation of preservice teachers’ impact on P-5 students to enhance teaching and learning during practicum courses. Content includes findings from a study we designed to examine preservice teachers’ support and impact on P-5 student learning with the end goal of teacher education programs in mind—to prepare teachers to positively impact student learning. We collected data from early childhood education candidates across three tiers of practicum courses, examined the support they provided to featured P-5 students during instructional units, and analyzed how that support impacted the young students’ learning. The quantitative results indicate a significant difference in the P-5 students’ scores on the pre- and post- unit assessments; no significant difference in scores between the tiers, gender, and subjects. The qualitative results reveal that the preservice teachers effectively support their P-5 students’ learning by providing accommodations and modifications, monitoring student progress, and offering recommendations to family. Recommendations include improving preservice teachers’ ability to analyze, interpret, and present data; and systematically collecting data on preservice teachers’ impact on P-5 students’ learning. Throughout the session, participants will be provided opportunity for discourse regarding improving teaching and learning in practicum courses.

Location

Room 1002

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 28th, 11:00 AM Mar 28th, 11:45 AM

Fostering Effective Teachers: Examining Support and Impact of Preservice Teachers on P-5 Student Learning

Room 1002

The objective is to highlight the importance of using results of systematic investigation of preservice teachers’ impact on P-5 students to enhance teaching and learning during practicum courses. Content includes findings from a study we designed to examine preservice teachers’ support and impact on P-5 student learning with the end goal of teacher education programs in mind—to prepare teachers to positively impact student learning. We collected data from early childhood education candidates across three tiers of practicum courses, examined the support they provided to featured P-5 students during instructional units, and analyzed how that support impacted the young students’ learning. The quantitative results indicate a significant difference in the P-5 students’ scores on the pre- and post- unit assessments; no significant difference in scores between the tiers, gender, and subjects. The qualitative results reveal that the preservice teachers effectively support their P-5 students’ learning by providing accommodations and modifications, monitoring student progress, and offering recommendations to family. Recommendations include improving preservice teachers’ ability to analyze, interpret, and present data; and systematically collecting data on preservice teachers’ impact on P-5 students’ learning. Throughout the session, participants will be provided opportunity for discourse regarding improving teaching and learning in practicum courses.