Proposal Abstract

College instructors are always searching for methods to engage students in challenging, thought-provoking discussions that lead them outside of their comfort zones to draw conclusions. DUC-Web is a new teaching and learning strategy and graphic organizer that facilitates civil discourse and collaborative discussion of difficult topics for young adults. This strategy was developed by Rieman and six undergraduates majoring in Mathematics, English, Special Education, History, and Physical Education who were enrolled in Rieman’s content area literacy methods course. The students first tried out a discussion strategy as learners themselves, and then continued to discuss and modify the strategy in order to increase its effectiveness and actually alter its innate purpose, moving from a focus on persuasion to a focus on collaboration. Next, the students used the altered strategy in their own teaching of middle and high school students during their field experiences. The undergraduates’ and Rieman’s reflections on teaching with the strategy became the data gathered in this study. This qualitative study will be nearing completion at the time of this panel discussion. Rieman and her students will share their experiences in creating and implementing the strategy, as well as their reflections on their roles as participant/researchers.

Location

Room 2005

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 27th, 3:00 PM Mar 27th, 3:45 PM

DUC-Web: Students & Professor Collaborating to Create a Teaching Strategy

Room 2005

College instructors are always searching for methods to engage students in challenging, thought-provoking discussions that lead them outside of their comfort zones to draw conclusions. DUC-Web is a new teaching and learning strategy and graphic organizer that facilitates civil discourse and collaborative discussion of difficult topics for young adults. This strategy was developed by Rieman and six undergraduates majoring in Mathematics, English, Special Education, History, and Physical Education who were enrolled in Rieman’s content area literacy methods course. The students first tried out a discussion strategy as learners themselves, and then continued to discuss and modify the strategy in order to increase its effectiveness and actually alter its innate purpose, moving from a focus on persuasion to a focus on collaboration. Next, the students used the altered strategy in their own teaching of middle and high school students during their field experiences. The undergraduates’ and Rieman’s reflections on teaching with the strategy became the data gathered in this study. This qualitative study will be nearing completion at the time of this panel discussion. Rieman and her students will share their experiences in creating and implementing the strategy, as well as their reflections on their roles as participant/researchers.