Proposal Title

Dialogue as Praxis: The Power of the Community

Proposal Abstract

Dialogue is not only a pedagogic practice to engage students, but also a philosophical approach that espouses a genuine sharing of knowledge and power toward dialectical thinking. Following Freire's concept of education of liberation rather than domestication, students learn to listen carefully to each other and respond directly to questions/statements within a circle of shared power and self-reflection, with instructor as mere catalyst int the process. Dialogue remains a challenge after decades of teaching, but utilizing SoTL methods and a strong belief in community building, the journey from instructor-dominated discussions to genuine dialogue, where students recognize their power through cooperative learning, has been edifying. Anecdotal responses, course evaluations and improved levels of student work substantiate the efficacy of dialogue- reflection - action.

The objectives of this interactive session are: 1) to apply SoTL standards of adequate preparation, reflective critique and effective communication to group praxis; and 2) to analyze and differentiate between instructor-controlled discussion and true dialogue, where internal tensions and contradictions may exist, but where learning ensues. Participants will compare and analyze levels of group process and improve their facilitation skills through participatory example and exercises.

Location

Room 1002

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 26th, 10:00 AM Mar 26th, 10:45 AM

Dialogue as Praxis: The Power of the Community

Room 1002

Dialogue is not only a pedagogic practice to engage students, but also a philosophical approach that espouses a genuine sharing of knowledge and power toward dialectical thinking. Following Freire's concept of education of liberation rather than domestication, students learn to listen carefully to each other and respond directly to questions/statements within a circle of shared power and self-reflection, with instructor as mere catalyst int the process. Dialogue remains a challenge after decades of teaching, but utilizing SoTL methods and a strong belief in community building, the journey from instructor-dominated discussions to genuine dialogue, where students recognize their power through cooperative learning, has been edifying. Anecdotal responses, course evaluations and improved levels of student work substantiate the efficacy of dialogue- reflection - action.

The objectives of this interactive session are: 1) to apply SoTL standards of adequate preparation, reflective critique and effective communication to group praxis; and 2) to analyze and differentiate between instructor-controlled discussion and true dialogue, where internal tensions and contradictions may exist, but where learning ensues. Participants will compare and analyze levels of group process and improve their facilitation skills through participatory example and exercises.