Proposal Abstract

A number of universities have transitioned their required or developmental math courses to a math emporium format in an effort to combat high failure rates in these courses (Twigg, 2011). The emporium format allows students to focus on practice problems, rather than lecture, to work in areas they are struggling, and to seek immediate assistance when needed. As universities make this transition they have tracked results on final exams, final grades, and assignments. This research expands that by tracking motivation and math anxiety as well as grade in three courses. Motivation allows us to see not only how students are performing, but how they feel about math. An emporium format should increase their self-efficacy, their beliefs about their ability to do the work, by providing many opportunities for success and guidance on how to fix mistakes. For both of the developmental math courses self-efficacy increased from the last semester in traditional format to the second semester in the emporium format. We will discuss these results and how they expand our understanding of the implications of the transition to math emporium. This presentation will provide ample opportunity for interaction. There will be opportunities to interact with presenters about the math emporium, the research design, and results.

Location

1005

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 28th, 9:00 AM Mar 28th, 9:45 AM

Transitioning to Math Emporium, the Impact on Student Motivation and Performance

1005

A number of universities have transitioned their required or developmental math courses to a math emporium format in an effort to combat high failure rates in these courses (Twigg, 2011). The emporium format allows students to focus on practice problems, rather than lecture, to work in areas they are struggling, and to seek immediate assistance when needed. As universities make this transition they have tracked results on final exams, final grades, and assignments. This research expands that by tracking motivation and math anxiety as well as grade in three courses. Motivation allows us to see not only how students are performing, but how they feel about math. An emporium format should increase their self-efficacy, their beliefs about their ability to do the work, by providing many opportunities for success and guidance on how to fix mistakes. For both of the developmental math courses self-efficacy increased from the last semester in traditional format to the second semester in the emporium format. We will discuss these results and how they expand our understanding of the implications of the transition to math emporium. This presentation will provide ample opportunity for interaction. There will be opportunities to interact with presenters about the math emporium, the research design, and results.