Proposal Abstract

‘Listening’ to student comments about their online course experiences during weekly discussions in a post-baccalaureate secondary online teacher certification program inspired this project. As these students are pre-teachers, the methods to create learning environments for academic success are a common thread in their coursework. The inquiry posed in this qualitative multi-case study was to examine student perceptions of course design elements that supported student success in a course that occurred prior to student teaching, while looking through the lens of the fundamental pedagogical shift needed for online student success due to asynchronous communication and the necessity of extensive course pre-planning (LaPointe & Reisetter, 2008; Reisetter, LaPointe, Korcuska, 2007). Four course design elements were studied and findings unique to supporting online learning were uncovered (Milheim, 2012; Sockalingham, 2012). Emergent themes placed the most value on Strong Course Organization, Time-Flexible Feedback, Confidence in the Instructor’s Content Ability and Consistent Support, and Relevance of Both Feedback and Coursework. Session participants will be provided with research background, the use of an online laddering questionnaire strategy, data triangulation information, and a discussion about how student perspectives about their online course success may be implemented into the participant’s online courses.

Location

Room 2002

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 27th, 9:00 AM Mar 27th, 9:45 AM

A Multi-Case Study of Student Perceptions of Online Course Design Elements and Success

Room 2002

‘Listening’ to student comments about their online course experiences during weekly discussions in a post-baccalaureate secondary online teacher certification program inspired this project. As these students are pre-teachers, the methods to create learning environments for academic success are a common thread in their coursework. The inquiry posed in this qualitative multi-case study was to examine student perceptions of course design elements that supported student success in a course that occurred prior to student teaching, while looking through the lens of the fundamental pedagogical shift needed for online student success due to asynchronous communication and the necessity of extensive course pre-planning (LaPointe & Reisetter, 2008; Reisetter, LaPointe, Korcuska, 2007). Four course design elements were studied and findings unique to supporting online learning were uncovered (Milheim, 2012; Sockalingham, 2012). Emergent themes placed the most value on Strong Course Organization, Time-Flexible Feedback, Confidence in the Instructor’s Content Ability and Consistent Support, and Relevance of Both Feedback and Coursework. Session participants will be provided with research background, the use of an online laddering questionnaire strategy, data triangulation information, and a discussion about how student perspectives about their online course success may be implemented into the participant’s online courses.