Proposal Title

Helping Students Retain What They Read: RRS and eRRS

Proposal Abstract

Students do not always complete assigned readings in college courses (Berry, Cook, Hill, & Stevens, 2010; Phillips & Phillips, 2007; Sikorski et al., 2002) or they read to cram for an exam (Clump, Bauer, & Bradley, 2004). We suggest that faculty create activities that are designed to help students retain the important concepts from the readings. The reading retention strategy (RRS) and the electronic reading retention strategy (eRRS) are designed to: assist students in understanding the main points from the class readings, create interaction with peers, and check their responses to prompting questions. The results of the study indicate that students ( n= 57) recalled more information when the RRS and eRRS were implemented. The objectives of the presentation are to discuss: the students' reactions to using the two strategies, the results of the study, and recommendations for implementing this strategy when teaching in a college classroom.

Location

Room 217

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 28th, 11:00 AM Mar 28th, 11:45 AM

Helping Students Retain What They Read: RRS and eRRS

Room 217

Students do not always complete assigned readings in college courses (Berry, Cook, Hill, & Stevens, 2010; Phillips & Phillips, 2007; Sikorski et al., 2002) or they read to cram for an exam (Clump, Bauer, & Bradley, 2004). We suggest that faculty create activities that are designed to help students retain the important concepts from the readings. The reading retention strategy (RRS) and the electronic reading retention strategy (eRRS) are designed to: assist students in understanding the main points from the class readings, create interaction with peers, and check their responses to prompting questions. The results of the study indicate that students ( n= 57) recalled more information when the RRS and eRRS were implemented. The objectives of the presentation are to discuss: the students' reactions to using the two strategies, the results of the study, and recommendations for implementing this strategy when teaching in a college classroom.