Proposal Title

The Engaged Brain: Cognitive Neuroscience and the Necessity of Active Learning Techniques

Proposal Abstract

Cognitive neuroscience has provided us with many inroads for the study of teaching and learning. This presentation synthesizes some existing brain-based learning theories (including the science of attention) along with my own research on the brain's amygdala (which has a major role in conditioned and unconditioned fear responses) to argue that the active learning techniques we recommend to our faculty are more than just good pedagogy; instead, they are vitally necessary for students to learn. My objectives for the session are 1) to present recent findings in brain-based research; 2) to demonstrate what this research can tell us about active learning strategies; 3) to engage the attendees in a dialogue about the implications of this research; and 4) to discuss ways to communicate these implications to faculty.

Location

Room 217

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 27th, 5:00 PM Mar 27th, 5:45 PM

The Engaged Brain: Cognitive Neuroscience and the Necessity of Active Learning Techniques

Room 217

Cognitive neuroscience has provided us with many inroads for the study of teaching and learning. This presentation synthesizes some existing brain-based learning theories (including the science of attention) along with my own research on the brain's amygdala (which has a major role in conditioned and unconditioned fear responses) to argue that the active learning techniques we recommend to our faculty are more than just good pedagogy; instead, they are vitally necessary for students to learn. My objectives for the session are 1) to present recent findings in brain-based research; 2) to demonstrate what this research can tell us about active learning strategies; 3) to engage the attendees in a dialogue about the implications of this research; and 4) to discuss ways to communicate these implications to faculty.