Proposal Title

Resuscitating Dead Language Instruction: Using Role-Playing Pedagogy in the Latin Classroom

Proposal Abstract

This presentation considers the results of a qualitative study conducted at the University of Georgia during fall semester, 2012; the study examines the effectiveness of using a role-playing game in an intermediate-level Latin class. Rather than learning only through Latin translation�the traditional approach at the intermediate level�students in the class spent five weeks playing �Beware the Ides of March: Rome in 44 BCE,� a game in the Reacting to the Past series, assuming the roles of Roman senators in the period immediately following the assassination of Julius Caesar. Students composed speeches, political graffiti, and other documents in Latin as part of the game. They delivered their original compositions orally to their fellow senators, thus putting their Latin skills to practical use. This presentation should be relevant to anyone who is involved with language instruction�ancient or modern�at the college or high-school level.

Location

Room 1005

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 27th, 3:00 PM Mar 27th, 3:45 PM

Resuscitating Dead Language Instruction: Using Role-Playing Pedagogy in the Latin Classroom

Room 1005

This presentation considers the results of a qualitative study conducted at the University of Georgia during fall semester, 2012; the study examines the effectiveness of using a role-playing game in an intermediate-level Latin class. Rather than learning only through Latin translation�the traditional approach at the intermediate level�students in the class spent five weeks playing �Beware the Ides of March: Rome in 44 BCE,� a game in the Reacting to the Past series, assuming the roles of Roman senators in the period immediately following the assassination of Julius Caesar. Students composed speeches, political graffiti, and other documents in Latin as part of the game. They delivered their original compositions orally to their fellow senators, thus putting their Latin skills to practical use. This presentation should be relevant to anyone who is involved with language instruction�ancient or modern�at the college or high-school level.