Proposal Title

Ple@ Bargaining: Lessons Learned from Teaching Email Negotiation in the Criminal Justice Context

Proposal Abstract

Teaching and learning negotiation typically involves using simulations to illustrate concepts, stimulate reflection, and integrate theory and practice. Face-to-face exercises are the most common, and though effective in some ways, fail to address the increasing reality of electronic modes of communication and typically focus on a single meeting rather than developing a negotiating relationship over time. Building on previous work in which law students negotiated a private transaction by email, we extended the idea to plea bargaining, a form of dispute resolution essential to the functioning of the criminal justice system and one in which the paramount consideration is the public interest. Using materials from the scenario and excerpts from the students' learning journals, we hope to show that such simulations can contribute to better integration of skills and theory and to deeper and more satisfying learning.

Location

Concourse

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 28th, 4:00 PM Mar 28th, 5:30 PM

Ple@ Bargaining: Lessons Learned from Teaching Email Negotiation in the Criminal Justice Context

Concourse

Teaching and learning negotiation typically involves using simulations to illustrate concepts, stimulate reflection, and integrate theory and practice. Face-to-face exercises are the most common, and though effective in some ways, fail to address the increasing reality of electronic modes of communication and typically focus on a single meeting rather than developing a negotiating relationship over time. Building on previous work in which law students negotiated a private transaction by email, we extended the idea to plea bargaining, a form of dispute resolution essential to the functioning of the criminal justice system and one in which the paramount consideration is the public interest. Using materials from the scenario and excerpts from the students' learning journals, we hope to show that such simulations can contribute to better integration of skills and theory and to deeper and more satisfying learning.