Proposal Title

Indicators of Student Success in First Semester Organic Chemistry: Implications in STEM Education

Proposal Abstract

Predicting student success in organic chemistry can be difficult because of wide ranges in student abilities, study strategies, and work ethics. At many institutions, students are required to earn a C or better in Organic Chemistry I to continue on to Organic Chemistry II. Six years of data at a single institution has been analyzed through a variety of statistical methods. The results of this analysis point to a student's performance on the first exam of Organic Chemistry I as a strong indicator for successful progress into the second semester course. This roundtable will discuss the current literature and approaches in predicting success in STEM fields, report the various statistical methods used in the study, examine the specific factors that were evaluated, and consider other factors for future analysis. Finally, the roundtable will discuss potential changes to STEM course design and pedagogical approaches in light of the results and their implications.

Location

Room 2905

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 9th, 10:00 AM Mar 9th, 10:45 AM

Indicators of Student Success in First Semester Organic Chemistry: Implications in STEM Education

Room 2905

Predicting student success in organic chemistry can be difficult because of wide ranges in student abilities, study strategies, and work ethics. At many institutions, students are required to earn a C or better in Organic Chemistry I to continue on to Organic Chemistry II. Six years of data at a single institution has been analyzed through a variety of statistical methods. The results of this analysis point to a student's performance on the first exam of Organic Chemistry I as a strong indicator for successful progress into the second semester course. This roundtable will discuss the current literature and approaches in predicting success in STEM fields, report the various statistical methods used in the study, examine the specific factors that were evaluated, and consider other factors for future analysis. Finally, the roundtable will discuss potential changes to STEM course design and pedagogical approaches in light of the results and their implications.