Proposal Abstract

In the last decade, higher education has been transformed by a rising number of new media suitable for online course delivery. While university instructors used to ask, “Should I deliver course content online?” Today they ask, “Which technology works best for delivering content online? Which technology can I quickly learn? And which technology can I easily manage?” To answer these questions, a team of university instructors/researchers compared and contrasted nine web-based technologies to determine each one's effectiveness. These technologies include: Wikis, Final Cut Pro, Audition, Facebook, Twitter, Camtasia, Wimba, GoToMeeting, and Second Life. Researchers gave particular attention to determining: (a) a technology's functionality, (b) how it has been used to-date, and (c) how it may be used in the future. Ultimately, the findings are a resource for Communication instructors, as well as instructors in other disciplines, to help them make an informed decision when selecting a technology for online instruction.

Location

Room 1909

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 9th, 10:00 AM Mar 9th, 10:45 AM

New Media, Technology, and Online Course Delivery: A Comparison of New Technologies for University Instructors

Room 1909

In the last decade, higher education has been transformed by a rising number of new media suitable for online course delivery. While university instructors used to ask, “Should I deliver course content online?” Today they ask, “Which technology works best for delivering content online? Which technology can I quickly learn? And which technology can I easily manage?” To answer these questions, a team of university instructors/researchers compared and contrasted nine web-based technologies to determine each one's effectiveness. These technologies include: Wikis, Final Cut Pro, Audition, Facebook, Twitter, Camtasia, Wimba, GoToMeeting, and Second Life. Researchers gave particular attention to determining: (a) a technology's functionality, (b) how it has been used to-date, and (c) how it may be used in the future. Ultimately, the findings are a resource for Communication instructors, as well as instructors in other disciplines, to help them make an informed decision when selecting a technology for online instruction.