Proposal Abstract

Presented are the results of a study comparing two types of reflection journals in a Spanish linguistics class. This project sought to answer two questions: 1) Does mode of reflection (written or oral) affect the degree of student reflection and 2) does the degree of reflection improve with practice? Participants in the study submitted three journals over the course of the semester. Half of the participants submitted written journals and half submitted oral journals, recorded via the institution's online learning management system. All participants were given the same instructions and prompts to help them structure their reflections. For each journal participants were allowed to choose the topic from a brief list of choices provided by the professor (all topics related to content covered in class). Journals were transcribed and analyzed by the researcher and an outside rater using a rubric that measured degrees of reflection ranging from recall to rationalization to reflection. Results suggest the oral mode to be the more effective method for eliciting reflection and that reflective thinking improves with practice.

Location

Room 2905

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 9th, 10:00 AM Mar 9th, 10:45 AM

Reflections on Linguistics: A New Context for Reflective Journaling?

Room 2905

Presented are the results of a study comparing two types of reflection journals in a Spanish linguistics class. This project sought to answer two questions: 1) Does mode of reflection (written or oral) affect the degree of student reflection and 2) does the degree of reflection improve with practice? Participants in the study submitted three journals over the course of the semester. Half of the participants submitted written journals and half submitted oral journals, recorded via the institution's online learning management system. All participants were given the same instructions and prompts to help them structure their reflections. For each journal participants were allowed to choose the topic from a brief list of choices provided by the professor (all topics related to content covered in class). Journals were transcribed and analyzed by the researcher and an outside rater using a rubric that measured degrees of reflection ranging from recall to rationalization to reflection. Results suggest the oral mode to be the more effective method for eliciting reflection and that reflective thinking improves with practice.