Proposal Title

Improving Curriculum Development in Conflict Resolution Programs through Scholarship of Engagement

Proposal Abstract

The content of this session focuses on curriculum development in the area of Conflict Resolution (CR), with the goal of enhancing the SOTL by introducing a field immersion component to program courses. The poster presentation is based on two Global Practicum courses where a field immersion component took place in Ecuador (2010) and Suriname (2011). The field immersion took place in a context where the institutional setting for these courses was developed under a partnering relationship among the University offering the course, and local organizations, academic institutions, government officials in the host country. In each of the two cases discussed, students traveled to the field/conflict settings for fifteen days, where they engaged in a variety of activities with local farmers, community groups, local organizations and policy-makers. These courses combined experiential learning and scholarship of engagement within the context of CR. The course activities before, during and after the courses were selected in order to facilitate transformational learning. The poster analyzes SOTL implications of designing curriculum that embraces experiential learning and scholarship of engagement for CR.

Location

Atrium/Concourse

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 8th, 4:00 PM Mar 8th, 5:45 PM

Improving Curriculum Development in Conflict Resolution Programs through Scholarship of Engagement

Atrium/Concourse

The content of this session focuses on curriculum development in the area of Conflict Resolution (CR), with the goal of enhancing the SOTL by introducing a field immersion component to program courses. The poster presentation is based on two Global Practicum courses where a field immersion component took place in Ecuador (2010) and Suriname (2011). The field immersion took place in a context where the institutional setting for these courses was developed under a partnering relationship among the University offering the course, and local organizations, academic institutions, government officials in the host country. In each of the two cases discussed, students traveled to the field/conflict settings for fifteen days, where they engaged in a variety of activities with local farmers, community groups, local organizations and policy-makers. These courses combined experiential learning and scholarship of engagement within the context of CR. The course activities before, during and after the courses were selected in order to facilitate transformational learning. The poster analyzes SOTL implications of designing curriculum that embraces experiential learning and scholarship of engagement for CR.