Proposal Title

No Significant Difference Unless You Are a Jumper

Proposal Abstract

Numerous studies show there is no significant difference between student performance in online versus traditional courses. Unfortunately, these studies are unable to identify how a given student would have performed in the other format. Our empirical study involving over 550 students (about 250 online and 300 regular classroom students) investigates whether a student who took a course in an online setting would have performed significantly better or worse (where significant is defined as “jumping” in rank order by 2 or more deciles) if he/she had taken the same course in a traditional classroom based setting and vice versa. To create our “jumper” statistic, we form setting specific regressions (i.e., online versus in-class) relating final decile rank in the class to student demographic and learning style variables. We then use the “other” regression to predict how each student would have performed in a different setting. Our results show that nearly one-half of all students would jump 2 or more deciles, with positive and negative jumpers being nearly equal. Our study has significant implications for student advising.

Location

Room 2904

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 8th, 9:00 AM Mar 8th, 9:45 AM

No Significant Difference Unless You Are a Jumper

Room 2904

Numerous studies show there is no significant difference between student performance in online versus traditional courses. Unfortunately, these studies are unable to identify how a given student would have performed in the other format. Our empirical study involving over 550 students (about 250 online and 300 regular classroom students) investigates whether a student who took a course in an online setting would have performed significantly better or worse (where significant is defined as “jumping” in rank order by 2 or more deciles) if he/she had taken the same course in a traditional classroom based setting and vice versa. To create our “jumper” statistic, we form setting specific regressions (i.e., online versus in-class) relating final decile rank in the class to student demographic and learning style variables. We then use the “other” regression to predict how each student would have performed in a different setting. Our results show that nearly one-half of all students would jump 2 or more deciles, with positive and negative jumpers being nearly equal. Our study has significant implications for student advising.