Proposal Abstract

Research has suggested that personality measures predict a range of targeted performance criteria such as academic success. Studies attempting to investigate the relationship between personality type and academic success have concluded that this relationship is moderated by both student learning styles and instructor teaching methods; in that, people develop a preference for a particular learning style and the depth of their learning is, in part, a function of this preferred style of learning and the teaching methods used by their instructors. It has been suggested that tailoring instructor teaching methods to student learning styles has the potential to improve student performance and decrease professorial frustration. Given the similarity between personality and learning style, this study sought to discover whether personality type instruments and learning style instruments individually predict academic success and what impact the overlap between the two constructs has on measures of academic success. Results indicate that personality variables, teaching methods and learning styles account for a small yet significant amount of the variance in measures of academic success.

Location

Room 2911

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 8th, 9:00 AM Mar 8th, 9:45 AM

Student Learning Styles and Personality Types: Their Implications for Teaching

Room 2911

Research has suggested that personality measures predict a range of targeted performance criteria such as academic success. Studies attempting to investigate the relationship between personality type and academic success have concluded that this relationship is moderated by both student learning styles and instructor teaching methods; in that, people develop a preference for a particular learning style and the depth of their learning is, in part, a function of this preferred style of learning and the teaching methods used by their instructors. It has been suggested that tailoring instructor teaching methods to student learning styles has the potential to improve student performance and decrease professorial frustration. Given the similarity between personality and learning style, this study sought to discover whether personality type instruments and learning style instruments individually predict academic success and what impact the overlap between the two constructs has on measures of academic success. Results indicate that personality variables, teaching methods and learning styles account for a small yet significant amount of the variance in measures of academic success.