Proposal Title

Mapping the Journey: Concept Maps in Teaching and Learning

Proposal Abstract

This presentation describes how concept maps were used as an innovative instructional and assessment tool in a pre-professional education course to model constructivist pedagogy and facilitate student achievement. Greater understanding of content was the impetus of using this strategy, though the notion of modeling constructivist approaches that students will use as teachers is fundamental to an effective teacher education program. Students were challenged to create four separate maps that incorporated theories, constructs, and concepts in a child development course. Students reported a sense of mastery learning, and noted the need to let go of “perfection” in order to deal with the “messiness” of the conceptual organization of theoretical connections. Thereby, experiencing the “journey” of mapping content greatly influenced the “destination” of learning. Using a mixed methods approach test scores, qualitative reflections, and rubric analyses revealed that concept mapping did affect student learning. Student work samples, map reflections, and rubrics for scoring are included. The audience will be encouraged to brainstorm ways in which concept maps can be used to as a teaching and learning method.

Location

Room 1909

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 7th, 5:00 PM Mar 7th, 5:45 PM

Mapping the Journey: Concept Maps in Teaching and Learning

Room 1909

This presentation describes how concept maps were used as an innovative instructional and assessment tool in a pre-professional education course to model constructivist pedagogy and facilitate student achievement. Greater understanding of content was the impetus of using this strategy, though the notion of modeling constructivist approaches that students will use as teachers is fundamental to an effective teacher education program. Students were challenged to create four separate maps that incorporated theories, constructs, and concepts in a child development course. Students reported a sense of mastery learning, and noted the need to let go of “perfection” in order to deal with the “messiness” of the conceptual organization of theoretical connections. Thereby, experiencing the “journey” of mapping content greatly influenced the “destination” of learning. Using a mixed methods approach test scores, qualitative reflections, and rubric analyses revealed that concept mapping did affect student learning. Student work samples, map reflections, and rubrics for scoring are included. The audience will be encouraged to brainstorm ways in which concept maps can be used to as a teaching and learning method.