Proposal Title

“Read the Text, As If!” The Reading Retention Strategy

Proposal Abstract

Students do not always read what is expected in college courses (Berry, Cook, Hill, & Stevens, 2010; Phillips & Phillips, 2007; Sikorski et al., 2002) or they read to cram for an exam or quiz (Clump, Bauer, & Bradley, 2004). The Reading Retention Strategy (RRS) is designed to assist students in understanding the main points of the readings and includes students interacting with peers to reinforce and check their responses to prompting questions. Participants included two education professors and their 57 students enrolled in two sections of a four week summer course. The results of the study indicate that students, when the RRS was employed, recalled more information than when the strategy was not implemented. The objectives of the presentation are twofold: first, to discuss the students' reactions to using the strategy and their improved retention of concepts; and second, to offer attendees recommendations for implementing this strategy when teaching in a college classroom.

Location

Room 2904

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 7th, 11:00 AM Mar 7th, 11:45 AM

“Read the Text, As If!” The Reading Retention Strategy

Room 2904

Students do not always read what is expected in college courses (Berry, Cook, Hill, & Stevens, 2010; Phillips & Phillips, 2007; Sikorski et al., 2002) or they read to cram for an exam or quiz (Clump, Bauer, & Bradley, 2004). The Reading Retention Strategy (RRS) is designed to assist students in understanding the main points of the readings and includes students interacting with peers to reinforce and check their responses to prompting questions. Participants included two education professors and their 57 students enrolled in two sections of a four week summer course. The results of the study indicate that students, when the RRS was employed, recalled more information than when the strategy was not implemented. The objectives of the presentation are twofold: first, to discuss the students' reactions to using the strategy and their improved retention of concepts; and second, to offer attendees recommendations for implementing this strategy when teaching in a college classroom.