Proposal Abstract

The practice of mentoring has proliferated tremendously and occurs in many different forms. The advent of Internet technology offers some new possibilities to traditional face-to-face mentoring relationships in which mentoring relationships are not constrained by physical proximity (e-mentoring). This presentation will describe the results of a research study involving the relationship between willingness to participate in e-mentoring relationships and prior mentoring and CMC experiences. The researchers considered three hypotheses: 1) positive prior mentoring experiences will increase the likelihood of participating in e-mentoring; 2) positive prior experiences with CMC will increase the likelihood of participating in e-mentoring; 3) the form of CMC used will influence the nature of the e-mentoring experience. These findings are structured around the theoretical frameworks of social exchange (both mentor and protégé must receive benefits from the relationship), social presence (CMC diminishes the ability to interpret visual and auditory cues) and power. Attendees will consider the implications of these results in terms of how e-mentoring could address goals at both the classroom and institutional level.

Location

Room 2903

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 7th, 11:00 AM Mar 7th, 11:45 AM

Prior Mentoring and Computer-Mediated Experiences Influence on Willingness to Engage in E-Mentoring

Room 2903

The practice of mentoring has proliferated tremendously and occurs in many different forms. The advent of Internet technology offers some new possibilities to traditional face-to-face mentoring relationships in which mentoring relationships are not constrained by physical proximity (e-mentoring). This presentation will describe the results of a research study involving the relationship between willingness to participate in e-mentoring relationships and prior mentoring and CMC experiences. The researchers considered three hypotheses: 1) positive prior mentoring experiences will increase the likelihood of participating in e-mentoring; 2) positive prior experiences with CMC will increase the likelihood of participating in e-mentoring; 3) the form of CMC used will influence the nature of the e-mentoring experience. These findings are structured around the theoretical frameworks of social exchange (both mentor and protégé must receive benefits from the relationship), social presence (CMC diminishes the ability to interpret visual and auditory cues) and power. Attendees will consider the implications of these results in terms of how e-mentoring could address goals at both the classroom and institutional level.