Proposal Abstract

Initial pilot work in an introductory psychology course compared three models of student exposure to study strategy information; results indicated that students significantly benefited when study strategies were integrated into course content and when metacognitive techniques were modeled in the classroom. Based on this pilot work, a web-based Study Skills Website (SSW) was created. The SSW introduced a number of modules, each incorporating course content, including: time management, studying/reading, general study habits, listening/note-taking, and test-taking and managing anxiety. Assessment of exposure to this website compared introductory psychology students over two terms, comparing an experimental group (SSW) with a control group (Psychology Readings Website). Significant group differences, as assessed by the Study Behavior Inventory, were obtained in measures of academic self-efficacy and self-management skills for students in the experimental group. Grades were higher for study participants than for nonparticipants. There were no grade differences between the experimental and control groups however. We conclude that the use of the Study Skills Website significantly contributed to students' perceptions of their own capability and increased student confidence.

Location

Room 2905

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 7th, 11:00 AM Mar 7th, 11:45 AM

Student Self-Efficacy and Attitudes Following Integration of Study Strategy Information into Course Content

Room 2905

Initial pilot work in an introductory psychology course compared three models of student exposure to study strategy information; results indicated that students significantly benefited when study strategies were integrated into course content and when metacognitive techniques were modeled in the classroom. Based on this pilot work, a web-based Study Skills Website (SSW) was created. The SSW introduced a number of modules, each incorporating course content, including: time management, studying/reading, general study habits, listening/note-taking, and test-taking and managing anxiety. Assessment of exposure to this website compared introductory psychology students over two terms, comparing an experimental group (SSW) with a control group (Psychology Readings Website). Significant group differences, as assessed by the Study Behavior Inventory, were obtained in measures of academic self-efficacy and self-management skills for students in the experimental group. Grades were higher for study participants than for nonparticipants. There were no grade differences between the experimental and control groups however. We conclude that the use of the Study Skills Website significantly contributed to students' perceptions of their own capability and increased student confidence.