Proposal Abstract

The most powerful tool to helping students learn is feedback, but it must be delivered promptly. The feedback is designed to tell the student where they went wrong, to further develop their understanding through explanation and then give them an opportunity to demonstrate they have learned the material. In this study, multiple-choice on-line quizzes were given to chemistry survey classes. Students took the quiz once, then immediately receive their score and the ability to view feedback. Each student could choose to re-take the quiz (different questions, same concepts) knowing if they chose a second attempt that score would be their grade. On average 44% of students chose to repeat the quiz, and scores improved on average 16%. Attendees will receive some ideas for applying and preparing feedback for their own quizzes/assignments and there will be open discussion about the technique and its application to multiple disciplines and question types.

Location

Concourse

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 10th, 2:00 PM Mar 10th, 3:00 PM

Utilizing Feedback in On-Line Quizzes to Improve Student Learning and Retention

Concourse

The most powerful tool to helping students learn is feedback, but it must be delivered promptly. The feedback is designed to tell the student where they went wrong, to further develop their understanding through explanation and then give them an opportunity to demonstrate they have learned the material. In this study, multiple-choice on-line quizzes were given to chemistry survey classes. Students took the quiz once, then immediately receive their score and the ability to view feedback. Each student could choose to re-take the quiz (different questions, same concepts) knowing if they chose a second attempt that score would be their grade. On average 44% of students chose to repeat the quiz, and scores improved on average 16%. Attendees will receive some ideas for applying and preparing feedback for their own quizzes/assignments and there will be open discussion about the technique and its application to multiple disciplines and question types.