Proposal Title

Reciprocity in Teaching and Learning: Give Students an Hour and They Will Take a Task or Two

Proposal Abstract

While there are obvious benefits of summer school for students and faculty alike, summer teaching/learning poses some unique challenges. The content is often condensed and there are shorter periods between both formative and summative assessments. Grounded in SoTL, this presentation discusses the process, products, and implications of a constructivist teaching activity in which summer class time was bartered out of class application tasks. The journey of bartering time for task involves (1) creating tasks that are appropriate in scope and aligned with the course objectives; (2) establishing assessment criteria and creating rubrics; (3) sequencing and scheduling tasks; (4) grading tasks and providing feedback to students; and (5) modifying, eliminating, or creating new tasks based on observation and feedback from students. Although delineation is necessary in making public (Huber and Hutchings, 2005) what was done in private to improve teaching and learning, the process is recursive rather than linear.

Location

Room 2911

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 9th, 11:00 AM Mar 9th, 11:45 AM

Reciprocity in Teaching and Learning: Give Students an Hour and They Will Take a Task or Two

Room 2911

While there are obvious benefits of summer school for students and faculty alike, summer teaching/learning poses some unique challenges. The content is often condensed and there are shorter periods between both formative and summative assessments. Grounded in SoTL, this presentation discusses the process, products, and implications of a constructivist teaching activity in which summer class time was bartered out of class application tasks. The journey of bartering time for task involves (1) creating tasks that are appropriate in scope and aligned with the course objectives; (2) establishing assessment criteria and creating rubrics; (3) sequencing and scheduling tasks; (4) grading tasks and providing feedback to students; and (5) modifying, eliminating, or creating new tasks based on observation and feedback from students. Although delineation is necessary in making public (Huber and Hutchings, 2005) what was done in private to improve teaching and learning, the process is recursive rather than linear.