Proposal Abstract

This presentation is designed for attendees interested in co-designing courses. I open with a synapse of my qualitative research on four collaborative teaching efforts I engaged in from 2005-2010; I highlight practices that contributed to and hindered successful collaboration. I then summarize how one of these collaborative course designs succeeded in improving our teaching and student outcomes, especially by increasing formative assessment . Audience members' ideas for collaborative course designs then move to center stage. I present a broad framework for successful collaboration based on my research, and paired attendees will use this to collaborate on their course designs. After identifying goals, implementation, and assessment, we will use iterative mental experiments , in which the pairs verbalize a course design and talk their way through every stage, record likely problems and modifications, and "return" to the first day of class and talk our way through the entire course again.

Location

Room 1908

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 9th, 5:00 PM Mar 9th, 5:45 PM

Benefits, Strategies, and Pitfalls of Faculty Collaboration

Room 1908

This presentation is designed for attendees interested in co-designing courses. I open with a synapse of my qualitative research on four collaborative teaching efforts I engaged in from 2005-2010; I highlight practices that contributed to and hindered successful collaboration. I then summarize how one of these collaborative course designs succeeded in improving our teaching and student outcomes, especially by increasing formative assessment . Audience members' ideas for collaborative course designs then move to center stage. I present a broad framework for successful collaboration based on my research, and paired attendees will use this to collaborate on their course designs. After identifying goals, implementation, and assessment, we will use iterative mental experiments , in which the pairs verbalize a course design and talk their way through every stage, record likely problems and modifications, and "return" to the first day of class and talk our way through the entire course again.