Proposal Title

Effect on Student Learning and Attitudes Toward Science in a Non-Majors Biology Course

Proposal Abstract

In a liberal arts education, non-science majors must take a science course to graduate. Many of these students fear science courses and the volume of information to learn. Curriculum was developed to reduce the amount of content driven topics and instead design courses that would improve scientific literacy while showing real world applications. Previous studies have shown that active learning techniques improve classroom learning; therefore several activities were incorporated into a non-majors Biology course. These activities included case studies and interactive exercises designed to help understand complex concepts in biology. Data shows 55% of the students enrolling in the non-majors Biology course in this study enjoyed working in groups to solve problems at the start of the semester. At the end of the semester, 74% of the students felt the group assignments and activities were useful and helped them understand the course material better than other methods.

Location

Concourse

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 11th, 4:00 PM Mar 11th, 5:45 PM

Effect on Student Learning and Attitudes Toward Science in a Non-Majors Biology Course

Concourse

In a liberal arts education, non-science majors must take a science course to graduate. Many of these students fear science courses and the volume of information to learn. Curriculum was developed to reduce the amount of content driven topics and instead design courses that would improve scientific literacy while showing real world applications. Previous studies have shown that active learning techniques improve classroom learning; therefore several activities were incorporated into a non-majors Biology course. These activities included case studies and interactive exercises designed to help understand complex concepts in biology. Data shows 55% of the students enrolling in the non-majors Biology course in this study enjoyed working in groups to solve problems at the start of the semester. At the end of the semester, 74% of the students felt the group assignments and activities were useful and helped them understand the course material better than other methods.