Proposal Abstract

Because of the rigor required to learn and apply content in a college-level accounting course, student success is largely determined by their level of dedication to learning. Identification of variables that influence students' level of dedication to learning has important implications for educators who have the opportunity to influence such behaviors and enhance performance outcomes in the accounting classroom. Keller's ARCS model of motivational design suggests that a student's level of interest (Attention and Relevance), Confidence, and Satisfaction influences their dedication to learning (Driscoll, 200?; Keller, 1987). In this study we use self-efficacy and locus of control as proxies for interest, self-confidence, and satisfaction. To investigate the effect of ARCS motivation on self-confidence in accounting, we employ instructional strategies such as verbal persuasion and modeling strategies. To measure the change in interest, confidence, and satisfaction, we compare self-efficacy and locus of control at the beginning and end of the semester.

Location

Room 2911

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 11th, 11:00 AM Mar 11th, 11:45 AM

How Do Motivational Strategies Affect Student Learning and Instructor Planning?

Room 2911

Because of the rigor required to learn and apply content in a college-level accounting course, student success is largely determined by their level of dedication to learning. Identification of variables that influence students' level of dedication to learning has important implications for educators who have the opportunity to influence such behaviors and enhance performance outcomes in the accounting classroom. Keller's ARCS model of motivational design suggests that a student's level of interest (Attention and Relevance), Confidence, and Satisfaction influences their dedication to learning (Driscoll, 200?; Keller, 1987). In this study we use self-efficacy and locus of control as proxies for interest, self-confidence, and satisfaction. To investigate the effect of ARCS motivation on self-confidence in accounting, we employ instructional strategies such as verbal persuasion and modeling strategies. To measure the change in interest, confidence, and satisfaction, we compare self-efficacy and locus of control at the beginning and end of the semester.