Proposal Title

Can Cell Phones Enhance Student Success?

Proposal Abstract

Students in science classes have traditionally made paper flash cards to assist them in learning facts of the disciplines. Today's students appear to be perpetually using their cell phones. This interactive presentation demonstrates the implementation and reports the assessment of a project which distributed cell phone flashcards to students in Principles of Chemistry I, Organic Chemistry, Principles of Biology I and Biochemistry over three semesters at GGC. Both qualitative and quantitative assessments were conducted. Student attitudes towards cell phone flashcards were evaluated using an attitudinal survey instrument completed by all students, followed by semi-structured interviews with four volunteer students. Interviews were audio taped, transcribed and evaluated according to an interpretivist theoretical perspective. In addition, a quantitative evaluation of student performance on factual recall questions on the final exams given in the courses is correlated with their self-reported use of the cell phone flash cards on the attitudinal survey.

Location

Room 1909

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Share

COinS
 
Mar 10th, 3:00 PM Mar 10th, 3:45 PM

Can Cell Phones Enhance Student Success?

Room 1909

Students in science classes have traditionally made paper flash cards to assist them in learning facts of the disciplines. Today's students appear to be perpetually using their cell phones. This interactive presentation demonstrates the implementation and reports the assessment of a project which distributed cell phone flashcards to students in Principles of Chemistry I, Organic Chemistry, Principles of Biology I and Biochemistry over three semesters at GGC. Both qualitative and quantitative assessments were conducted. Student attitudes towards cell phone flashcards were evaluated using an attitudinal survey instrument completed by all students, followed by semi-structured interviews with four volunteer students. Interviews were audio taped, transcribed and evaluated according to an interpretivist theoretical perspective. In addition, a quantitative evaluation of student performance on factual recall questions on the final exams given in the courses is correlated with their self-reported use of the cell phone flash cards on the attitudinal survey.