Proposal Title

Introducing Method Development through Multivariable Experimental Design

Proposal Abstract

Method development and assessment are central components in any chemical analysis and are essential to excellence in research performance. To better prepare undergraduate students for their future in industry and academic research environments, we introduced concepts of method development and multivariable experimental design in an inquiry-based setting following the principles of the scientific method (i.e., hypothesis driven research). Specifically, the optimization of a solid phase micro extraction GC/MS method for the detection of pesticide residues in apples was performed and the impact on improving student understanding and learning was tested in several areas. We found that the approach chosen resulted in better literature comprehension, better understanding of the value of team work, improved organization and experimental design skills, scientific report writing, and data analysis. We foresee the possibility of extending this experience in the future by enabling undergraduate students to present their data as mini-papers or as professional reports.

Location

Concourse

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 12th, 4:00 PM Mar 12th, 5:45 PM

Introducing Method Development through Multivariable Experimental Design

Concourse

Method development and assessment are central components in any chemical analysis and are essential to excellence in research performance. To better prepare undergraduate students for their future in industry and academic research environments, we introduced concepts of method development and multivariable experimental design in an inquiry-based setting following the principles of the scientific method (i.e., hypothesis driven research). Specifically, the optimization of a solid phase micro extraction GC/MS method for the detection of pesticide residues in apples was performed and the impact on improving student understanding and learning was tested in several areas. We found that the approach chosen resulted in better literature comprehension, better understanding of the value of team work, improved organization and experimental design skills, scientific report writing, and data analysis. We foresee the possibility of extending this experience in the future by enabling undergraduate students to present their data as mini-papers or as professional reports.