Proposal Title

POGIL Methods to Assess and Improve Student Learning of Abstract Chemical Concepts

Proposal Abstract

Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) is one of the largest pedagogical reform movements in college-level chemistry teaching. The Guilford College Chemistry Department implements POGIL across the first three years of a standard chemistry curriculum. During their introductory semester, students must learn the mole concept, a solid understanding of which is necessary throughout the entire curriculum. Students often find it difficult to gain a thorough understanding of this concept. Our goal was to assess student learning of the mole concept using POGIL pedagogy with available curricular materials and whether learning improved with the use of materials modified according to our assessment work. We developed a diagnostic tool that was administered to students in a pre-test/post-test fashion, the results of which guided our curricular modifications. We will discuss the implications for further improvements that address the learning of abstract concepts essential for building a strong foundation in a discipline.

Location

Concourse

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 12th, 4:00 PM Mar 12th, 5:45 PM

POGIL Methods to Assess and Improve Student Learning of Abstract Chemical Concepts

Concourse

Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) is one of the largest pedagogical reform movements in college-level chemistry teaching. The Guilford College Chemistry Department implements POGIL across the first three years of a standard chemistry curriculum. During their introductory semester, students must learn the mole concept, a solid understanding of which is necessary throughout the entire curriculum. Students often find it difficult to gain a thorough understanding of this concept. Our goal was to assess student learning of the mole concept using POGIL pedagogy with available curricular materials and whether learning improved with the use of materials modified according to our assessment work. We developed a diagnostic tool that was administered to students in a pre-test/post-test fashion, the results of which guided our curricular modifications. We will discuss the implications for further improvements that address the learning of abstract concepts essential for building a strong foundation in a discipline.