Proposal Abstract

The two semester sequence in Organic Chemistry is challenging for many students, given the voluminous amount of information to master. However, mastery can be achieved if students develop an understanding of the broad themes and principles that form the “architecture” of the discipline. Since 2006, required assessment activities, both written and oral, have been used to assess whether or not an understanding of this architecture was being developed. Students received individual feedback on all written submissions, thus providing assistance to students when their performance indicated that this essential framework was not being sufficiently developed. Representative data comparing final course grade distribution before and after the use of assessment suggest that the program is effective in promoting student success. Although this project focuses on a specific course, the implementation of a required assessment component in other disciplines could be modeled on the principles to be described.

Location

Concourse

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 12th, 4:00 PM Mar 12th, 5:45 PM

Assessment: A Strategy for Success in Organic Chemistry

Concourse

The two semester sequence in Organic Chemistry is challenging for many students, given the voluminous amount of information to master. However, mastery can be achieved if students develop an understanding of the broad themes and principles that form the “architecture” of the discipline. Since 2006, required assessment activities, both written and oral, have been used to assess whether or not an understanding of this architecture was being developed. Students received individual feedback on all written submissions, thus providing assistance to students when their performance indicated that this essential framework was not being sufficiently developed. Representative data comparing final course grade distribution before and after the use of assessment suggest that the program is effective in promoting student success. Although this project focuses on a specific course, the implementation of a required assessment component in other disciplines could be modeled on the principles to be described.