Proposal Abstract

This presentation is designed to examine basic assumptions about what it means to learn, and what processes we are going though when we learn. If off-prescription use of cognition enhancing drugs is worth hundreds of millions of dollars a year, what does this tell us about the way students think about their own learning? As scholars of learning and teaching, would we agree with that view, or would a different perspective drawn from the work of Vygotsky be closer to our assumptions? This presentation will raise issues about how we think about what it means to learn, and what we need to be including in our lectures and seminars to develop metacognition in our students. It will challenge materialistic views of learning as brain function or the development of habit, and critically examine metaphors of learning based on brain science and notions of brain training.

Location

Room 2911

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 12th, 3:00 PM Mar 12th, 3:45 PM

What Should We Tell Our Students about Cognition Enhancing Drugs?

Room 2911

This presentation is designed to examine basic assumptions about what it means to learn, and what processes we are going though when we learn. If off-prescription use of cognition enhancing drugs is worth hundreds of millions of dollars a year, what does this tell us about the way students think about their own learning? As scholars of learning and teaching, would we agree with that view, or would a different perspective drawn from the work of Vygotsky be closer to our assumptions? This presentation will raise issues about how we think about what it means to learn, and what we need to be including in our lectures and seminars to develop metacognition in our students. It will challenge materialistic views of learning as brain function or the development of habit, and critically examine metaphors of learning based on brain science and notions of brain training.