Proposal Abstract

Everyday intuitive explanations of how students learn and how teachers should teach are termed “folk pedagogy” by Jerome Bruner (1996). He perceives educators' unwillingness to reflect upon their pedagogy as an illustration of the proverb “the fish will be the last to discover water” (p. 45). Since teaching is focused on different disciplines and on students who have many needs, it is quite understandable that a certain mythology has grown up around pedagogy at all levels. The presentation will include a dualistic exercise contrasting the myths and “facts” of teaching and learning in higher education. The presenters will explore questions like, “Do students really want to learn?” “Is the lecture still a good thing?” “Just what is teaching as compared to learning?” “Is teaching still necessary in this Information Age?” “What is the purpose of an exam?” “What is wrong with ‘covering' subject matter?” Attendees can anticipate an engaging discussion.

Location

Room 2904

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 11th, 2:00 PM Mar 11th, 2:45 PM

Folk Pedagogy in Higher Education

Room 2904

Everyday intuitive explanations of how students learn and how teachers should teach are termed “folk pedagogy” by Jerome Bruner (1996). He perceives educators' unwillingness to reflect upon their pedagogy as an illustration of the proverb “the fish will be the last to discover water” (p. 45). Since teaching is focused on different disciplines and on students who have many needs, it is quite understandable that a certain mythology has grown up around pedagogy at all levels. The presentation will include a dualistic exercise contrasting the myths and “facts” of teaching and learning in higher education. The presenters will explore questions like, “Do students really want to learn?” “Is the lecture still a good thing?” “Just what is teaching as compared to learning?” “Is teaching still necessary in this Information Age?” “What is the purpose of an exam?” “What is wrong with ‘covering' subject matter?” Attendees can anticipate an engaging discussion.