Proposal Title

Research-Based Applications of Analogy-Enhanced Instruction

Proposal Abstract

Since thinking and speech are interwoven with analogies, teachers across various disciplines have long relied on these language tools to introduce new concepts. In this presentation, I will review theoretical foundations for pedagogical uses of analogies, along with potential limitations and effective corrective measures when using analogy-enhanced teaching and learning. I will also present qualitative and quantitative evidence from my own classroom research in support of analogy-enhanced instruction, finding that learning gains are most striking when students are allowed to create their own analogies. Stemming from this finding, I will introduce a tripartite learning model and cooperative learning assignment that mirror a cyclical process through which learners outgrow earlier analogies by adopting increasingly sophisticated conceptualizations. I will conclude with interactive, analogy-based classroom activities involving audience participation.

Location

Room 2908

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 11th, 11:00 AM Mar 11th, 11:45 AM

Research-Based Applications of Analogy-Enhanced Instruction

Room 2908

Since thinking and speech are interwoven with analogies, teachers across various disciplines have long relied on these language tools to introduce new concepts. In this presentation, I will review theoretical foundations for pedagogical uses of analogies, along with potential limitations and effective corrective measures when using analogy-enhanced teaching and learning. I will also present qualitative and quantitative evidence from my own classroom research in support of analogy-enhanced instruction, finding that learning gains are most striking when students are allowed to create their own analogies. Stemming from this finding, I will introduce a tripartite learning model and cooperative learning assignment that mirror a cyclical process through which learners outgrow earlier analogies by adopting increasingly sophisticated conceptualizations. I will conclude with interactive, analogy-based classroom activities involving audience participation.