Proposal Abstract

Some research suggests that video games can be effective tools for learning complex subject matter and for teaching students how to manage and work with information in project settings. In this paper we discuss our experiences teaching and conducting SOTL research in an undergraduate Honors Interdisciplinary team-taught seminar. The course, entitled Gaming 360: The History, Culture, and Design of Video Games was taught during the Spring 2007 and Spring 2008 semesters and included 20 Honors in the Major (HIM) students. Our primary research question was this: How would students improve their understanding of video game production concepts (video games as technologies) and develop an understanding of video games as cultural and critical tools (video games as texts) as a result of participation in our honors seminar? Here we discuss teaching strategies and challenges and present a preliminary analysis of data from the first offering of this course.

Location

Room 2905

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 11th, 11:00 AM Mar 11th, 11:45 AM

Measuring Learning in an Honors Interdisciplinary Course on Video Games

Room 2905

Some research suggests that video games can be effective tools for learning complex subject matter and for teaching students how to manage and work with information in project settings. In this paper we discuss our experiences teaching and conducting SOTL research in an undergraduate Honors Interdisciplinary team-taught seminar. The course, entitled Gaming 360: The History, Culture, and Design of Video Games was taught during the Spring 2007 and Spring 2008 semesters and included 20 Honors in the Major (HIM) students. Our primary research question was this: How would students improve their understanding of video game production concepts (video games as technologies) and develop an understanding of video games as cultural and critical tools (video games as texts) as a result of participation in our honors seminar? Here we discuss teaching strategies and challenges and present a preliminary analysis of data from the first offering of this course.