Proposal Abstract

Students often report that they do not get written feedback that is helpful, and faculty often report that students do not take any notice of the written feedback they give. This presentation reports on research which tracked student writing within a discipline from one text to the next. The study investigated the different types of written feedback given and the impacts that these had on students' academic writing. The findings reveal the types of feedback that resulted in the most change, the types of feedback that did not result in much change, and the effect of context on students taking note of feedback. This interactive session aims to provide practical insights on those few carefully chosen words that make the most difference in developing student writing within the disciplinary context.

Location

Room 2911

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 11th, 10:00 AM Mar 11th, 10:45 AM

Improving Student Writing with Effective Feedback

Room 2911

Students often report that they do not get written feedback that is helpful, and faculty often report that students do not take any notice of the written feedback they give. This presentation reports on research which tracked student writing within a discipline from one text to the next. The study investigated the different types of written feedback given and the impacts that these had on students' academic writing. The findings reveal the types of feedback that resulted in the most change, the types of feedback that did not result in much change, and the effect of context on students taking note of feedback. This interactive session aims to provide practical insights on those few carefully chosen words that make the most difference in developing student writing within the disciplinary context.