Proposal Title

Experience with a Culturally Situated Design Tool: Learn to Culturally Whip Up a Computer

Proposal Abstract

Culturally situated design tools (CSDTs) are a collection of software tools that relate computing with fun aspects of various cultures. Part of the purpose of CSDTs is to help debunk some negative computing stigmas by using cultural activities that students are already familiar with. This may help increase the number of students pursuing computing. A hardware-based CSDT (hCSDT) called "Learn to Culturally Whip Up a Computer" is presented to complement existing CSDTs. A cultural cuisine metaphor has been designed based on various cultures so that students can relate making a meal to building a computer. Research results suggest that this hCSDT may help increase self-efficacy in computing. This session will benefit parents and educators wanting to find ways to convey computing concepts to students. Members of the audience will break up into teams of 3-5 members. Each person will be given a copy of the basic curriculum of the hCSDT.

Location

Room 2904

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 13th, 3:00 PM Mar 13th, 3:45 PM

Experience with a Culturally Situated Design Tool: Learn to Culturally Whip Up a Computer

Room 2904

Culturally situated design tools (CSDTs) are a collection of software tools that relate computing with fun aspects of various cultures. Part of the purpose of CSDTs is to help debunk some negative computing stigmas by using cultural activities that students are already familiar with. This may help increase the number of students pursuing computing. A hardware-based CSDT (hCSDT) called "Learn to Culturally Whip Up a Computer" is presented to complement existing CSDTs. A cultural cuisine metaphor has been designed based on various cultures so that students can relate making a meal to building a computer. Research results suggest that this hCSDT may help increase self-efficacy in computing. This session will benefit parents and educators wanting to find ways to convey computing concepts to students. Members of the audience will break up into teams of 3-5 members. Each person will be given a copy of the basic curriculum of the hCSDT.