Proposal Title

An Alignment Logic Model (ALM) for Verifiable Course Preparation and Improved Accountability

Proposal Abstract

A brief presentation of current "best practices" will be followed by hands-on activities with the goal of having each participant draft a functional alignment logic model (FALM). This model should clearly show connections between learning outcomes, activities, evaluation methods, and actual student learning. This session will be intensely focused on learning to produce and use a practical logic model for purposes of evaluation, accountability, and scholarship. Please bring a current syllabus to which the model will be applied. Participants should learn how to 1) achieve correct alignment of outcomes, assignments, and methods of assessment, 2) use the alignment logic model to document actual student learning, and 3) do this in a way that will allow external evaluators to more accurately ascertain that students have actually learned what we said they would learn.

Full Proposal

A brief but focused presentation of current ‘best practices’ research and evaluation will be followed by hands-on activities with the goal of having each participant leave the session with a written action plan, for the express purpose of initiating structured evaluation activities in their college classrooms. Specifically, each person will leave with a thorough example of an alignment logic model (ALM); they will also be able to develop logic models for use in course preparation (for accountability). Worksheets will be utilized during the session to allow development of an alignment logic model, which should clearly show the connections between learning outcomes, assignments/activities, evaluation methods, and actual student learning. This session will be intensely focused on learning to produce and use a practical and relevant logic model for purposes of evaluation and accountability.

Objectives of the Session:

As a result of attending this session, participants should be able to:

1. Discuss the most current literature related directly to functional alignment of learning outcomes, assignments, and assessments.

2. Understand use of a logic model for demonstrating and documenting that effective teaching has occurred.

3. Produce a viable alignment logic model to demonstrate accountability and effectiveness in the classroom.

4. Formulate an initial draft of an alignment logic model specific to a particular course.

Involvement in the session:

The initial presentation of the professional literature will lead directly to an interactive discussion and demonstration of the relevance of the alignment logic model. Depending on the number of attendees, use of dyads and/or small group interaction will require active involvement in logic model development, specifically as it relates to their own courses and interests, as well as program accreditation goals.

Participants will learn how to 1) achieve correct alignment of outcomes, assignments, and methods of assessment, 2) use the alignment logic model to accurately document student learning, and 3) do this in a way that will allow external evaluators to easily and clearly ascertain that learning has occurred.

Location

Room 2904 A

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Nov 2nd, 9:00 AM Nov 2nd, 9:45 AM

An Alignment Logic Model (ALM) for Verifiable Course Preparation and Improved Accountability

Room 2904 A

A brief presentation of current "best practices" will be followed by hands-on activities with the goal of having each participant draft a functional alignment logic model (FALM). This model should clearly show connections between learning outcomes, activities, evaluation methods, and actual student learning. This session will be intensely focused on learning to produce and use a practical logic model for purposes of evaluation, accountability, and scholarship. Please bring a current syllabus to which the model will be applied. Participants should learn how to 1) achieve correct alignment of outcomes, assignments, and methods of assessment, 2) use the alignment logic model to document actual student learning, and 3) do this in a way that will allow external evaluators to more accurately ascertain that students have actually learned what we said they would learn.