Proposal Title

Impact of Systematic Assessment on Nursing Success

Proposal Abstract

The purpose of this interactive presentation is to show how the process for systematic assessment of a bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) program triggered a new method of systematic analysis at the course level. Course analysis of data over time allows the teaching faculty to reflect on best practices for teaching and learning in order to make incremental changes that positively affect student learning. The process is one that may be applicable to other discipline programs despite differences in school mission, philosophy, program standards, and student population. Lessons learned and opportunities for more comprehensive pertinent evaluation methods are also discussed.

Full Proposal

The purpose of this presentation is to show how the process for systematic assessment of a bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) program triggered a new method of systematic analysis at the course level. Course analysis of data over time allows the teaching faculty to reflect on best practices for teaching and learning in order to make incremental changes that positively affect student learning. The process is one that may be applicable to other discipline programs despite differences in school mission, philosophy, program standards, and student population. Lessons learned and opportunities for more comprehensive pertinent evaluation methods are also discussed.

Student success in a nursing program is a source of pride by all stakeholders including patients and families, employers, and the nursing program faculty. Most literature that speaks of student success in a program refers to National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX) pass rates. The NCLEX exam serves as an external benchmark for all nursing programs in the United States. All applicants who are qualified to become a registered nurse sit for one exam that has a standard pass score. Unfortunately, it is possible to take nursing program success for granted until the success bubble breaks and student NCLEX pass scores drop. A spike in NCLEX failures forces faculty to review a multitude of variables including the quality of admission applicants, grades in nursing courses, remediation and progression policies, and use of standardized benchmarking exams.

Objectives of the Session

At the end of the presentation the participant will be able to:

Identify key discipline and course specific assessment and demographic components to use for course process improvement.

Design a course analysis template that can be used to aggregate data for reflective analysis.

Discuss how individual course analysis can contribute to the success of a discipline program.

Identify how course process improvement methodology can be used in course portfolios.

Ways of Involving the Audience in the Session

The participants are viewed as a rich resource of experienced faculty with a variety of backgrounds. The participants will work together in small groups to design a standard course analysis template that can be customized for individual courses.

What Attendees Can Expect to Experience and Learn

The attendees can expect to visualize new or modified ways of assessing best practices for teaching and learning using reflective analysis of student performance over time to come.

Location

Room 2904 A

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Nov 1st, 3:00 PM Nov 1st, 3:45 PM

Impact of Systematic Assessment on Nursing Success

Room 2904 A

The purpose of this interactive presentation is to show how the process for systematic assessment of a bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) program triggered a new method of systematic analysis at the course level. Course analysis of data over time allows the teaching faculty to reflect on best practices for teaching and learning in order to make incremental changes that positively affect student learning. The process is one that may be applicable to other discipline programs despite differences in school mission, philosophy, program standards, and student population. Lessons learned and opportunities for more comprehensive pertinent evaluation methods are also discussed.