Proposal Title

Pre-Service Teachers' Perceptions of Peer Observation and Feedback

Proposal Abstract

Within the context of the scholarship of teaching and learning, this session highlights the rationale, implementation, and results of a semi-structured study in which forty-five preservice elementary teachers, from six different instructors in early primary practicum classes at one university, observed and provided feedback, in a reciprocal manner, on their peers' teaching. The session will demonstrate how bringing the principles and characteristics of the scholarship of teaching and learning into the university classroom can support the development of teaching as scholarly activity for preservice teachers while cementing our own commitment in this regard. This session will describe and analyze this peer observation and feedback activity as part of the cycle of the scholarship of teaching and learning; and as evidence that praxis in the scholarship of teaching and learning can be beneficial at all levels of teaching and learning.

Full Proposal

The session highlights the rationale, implementation, and results of a semi-structured study in which forty-five pre-service elementary teachers, from six different instructors in early primary practicum classes at one university, observed and provided feedback, in a reciprocal manner, on their peers’ teaching. Participants’ roles involved attending an orientation; allowing themselves to be observed and given written and oral feedback by peers; observing peers and providing written and oral feedback to them; and anonymously completing a brief questionnaire and written comments at the end of the field experience.

On the questionnaire, six items (giving feedback, getting feedback, classroom management, concept development, use of resources, and self-esteem) were rated on a scale of 1-5 (1-no benefit, 2-unsure, 3-fair, 4-good, a 5-great). Data was collected and analyzed using simple descriptive statistics and narrative analysis. An examination of mean scores and narrative comments showed that overall pre-service teachers perceived participation in peer observation and feedback as beneficial. The mean score for the degree of benefit of giving feedback (m=4.20) and getting feedback (m=4.38) supported students’ narratives that the experience was beneficial. Pre-service teachers also rated the benefit of both giving and receiving feedback to their own classroom management (m=3.87), concept development (m=3.18), the use of resources (m=4.33), and self-esteem (m=4.33).

The session seeks to facilitate discussion on peer assessment as part of an overall assessment program, especially in pre-service teacher preparation programs or other programs with field/practicum components. An overview of literature, information pertinent to this particular study, and conclusions drawn from the study juxtaposed to the literature will be presented. The audience will be able to view both data as well comments provided by students; and ask questions and offer comments; and participate in a general discussion on advantages and challenges of implementing peer observation and feedback. The audience will be specifically invited to share their perspectives on peer observation experiences in which they have participated or have their own students participate. Suggestions for improving and refining the next phase of the study will also be sought.

As such attendees can expect to walk away with general information on peer observation and feedback; knowledge of process and outcomes of a local application of peer observation and feedback of elementary pre-service teachers; a sense of having contributed ideas toward research in the field; and ideas about whether and to what extent peer observation/feedback is feasible for their particular teaching and learning contexts.

Location

Room 2908

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Share

COinS
 
Nov 1st, 9:00 AM Nov 1st, 9:45 AM

Pre-Service Teachers' Perceptions of Peer Observation and Feedback

Room 2908

Within the context of the scholarship of teaching and learning, this session highlights the rationale, implementation, and results of a semi-structured study in which forty-five preservice elementary teachers, from six different instructors in early primary practicum classes at one university, observed and provided feedback, in a reciprocal manner, on their peers' teaching. The session will demonstrate how bringing the principles and characteristics of the scholarship of teaching and learning into the university classroom can support the development of teaching as scholarly activity for preservice teachers while cementing our own commitment in this regard. This session will describe and analyze this peer observation and feedback activity as part of the cycle of the scholarship of teaching and learning; and as evidence that praxis in the scholarship of teaching and learning can be beneficial at all levels of teaching and learning.